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Featured Speakers

Svetlana Androsova

Svetlana Androsova, PhD in Linguistics, Professor of the Department of Foreign Languages, spheres of interest: Phonetics and Phonology, teaching methods, phonetic programming.

Challenges of Teaching English Speech Production and Speech Perception for Russian Learners of English: Phonetic Issues That Really Matter

Plenary presentation

The current paper highlights challenging issues concerning the lack of understanding of common allophonic model of English native oral speech. The list of allophones that make the flow of speech difficult to perceive is presented. Learners pronunciation and listening efforts must be concentrated around those difficulties. Learners are encouraged to produce words with taps, glottalization, weak voiceless consonants, reduced vowels and sound omissions, to predict those modifications and recognized such words in speech.

June 25, Wednesday

12:30-13.20

Assembly Hall


Rob Danin

 

Dr. Rob Danin is a returning Senior English Language Fellow based at Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in Vladivostok. Dr. Danin has worked extensively in educational curriculum and program development as well as teacher preparation/training, both in the U.S and abroad. Rob can be reached through e-mail (robdanin@gmail.com) as well as his web site (www.robdanin.com).

Action Research: For Both Teacher and Student

Workshop

Action Research typically involves small-scale investigative projects in the teacher's own classroom. In recent years, action research has become increasingly popular as a form of professional development for teachers. The use of action research can provide the EFL teacher the ability to analyze their own professional development needs along with the academic needs of their students. Students can also create action research projects as a way of analyzing their own learning experiences. In this master class we will discuss the notion of “learning by doing” for both teacher and student.

June 23, Monday

15.00-16.40

Room 215


Project-Based Learning: PBL for EFL

Workshop

Project-Based Learning (PBL) is an effective and enjoyable way to learn for both teacher and student. Students become active learners through the completion of educational projects via real-world learning experiences. PBL requires hands-on learning through the completion of a product or performance. PBL clearly promotes the idea of "learning by doing". Project-based learning encourages ELLs to discover new vocabulary, actively engage others in non-rehearsed dialogue, and generally improve cognitive skills. PBL provides teachers the opportunity to work in a collaborative fashion with their students.

June 24, Tuesday

12.30-14.30

Room 215


Maria Lebedko

Maria G. Lebedko is Doctor of Philology, Full Professor at Far Eastern Federal University, Honorary researcher of the Russian Federation, teaches intercultural communication. She serves as an editorial board member of three professional journals; a co-editor of the “Dictionary of Intercultural Communication Terms” M.: Flinta – Nauka. 2013, 626 c.; a co-editor of the book “Critical Cultural Awareness: Managing Stereotypes through Intercultural (Language) Education” (2013), Cambridge Scholars Publishing. Reviewer of Intercultural Studies (ICS) journal, etc.

Stereotype Management Through Critical Incidents

Plenary presentation

Critical incidents are conflictful and puzzling situations, introduced by the aviation psychologist Colonel John C. Flanagan (1954). Later critical cultural incidents widely spread as an instrument to develop “cultural assimilator” in intercultural communication (Fiedler, Mitchell and Triandis, 1971). The concept of critical incident technique gave rise to the expanding body of research and practical application in education; its affective role has a great impact on students who tend to identify themselves with a person who is stereotyped. Effective stereotype management basically depends on how deeply students understand issues connected with stereotypes. Therefore, the goal of the study is to focus on the development of stereotype management in intercultural communication and education.

June 25, Wednesday

13:20-14.10

Assembly Hall


Alice Lee

 

In 2013, Alice S. Lee was appointed as Associate Director of the University of Macau’s English Language Centre, where she has been teaching English to multilingual students since 2004. She has held a number of different positions at the University, including Coordinator of the Writing Centre, Head Teacher, Subject Convener, and Chief Examiner (English). Alice has a Master’s degree in TESOL from California State University, Los Angeles and is a doctoral candidate (ABD) in the Composition and TESOL program at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Alice’s research interests include second language writing and writing center administration, interactional sociolinguistics, and World Englishes.

A Community of Practice Approach to Academic Publishing

Plenary presentation

This plenary argues for a reframing of academic writing from a “literacy as text” approach to a “literacy as practice” approach. This reframing allows writers to identify, organize, and utilize their current and potential networks—whether they are personal, local, national, or transnational—as they work toward the goal of academic publishing. The plenary also sketches out two possible models of collaboration—one formed on a personal level and one formed on an institutional level—to illustrate how a community of practice for academic publishing can be achieved.

June 23, Monday

12:30-13:20

Assembly Hall


A Genre-analysis Approach to Teaching Academic Writing

Workshop (for the teaching of academic writing to students)

This intensive workshop uses the basic 5-paragraph essay structure as a starting point for doing more demanding types of academic writing, including annotated bibliographies, documented essays, and research papers. The workshop incorporates other elements of academic writing, such as audience, purpose, and context, to achieve the dialogic needs of a piece of writing. Participants learn how to analyze any given piece of writing from a genre-analytic perspective, thus enabling them to deconstruct the purpose of the text as a whole and in parts. Deconstruction strategies can be applied across the board to other types of academic writing.

June 24, Tuesday

15.00-16.20

Room 215


Turning Your Ideas into Publishable Material: An Intensive Academic Publishing Workshop

Workshop (for emerging teacher-scholars)

This workshop aims to empower emerging teacher-scholars with concrete ideas on how to build their portfolio by beginning with entry level professional involvement. The workshop begins with the presenter sharing her insights on such involvement and how to gain access to the upper echelon of the disciplinary academic discourse community. By the end of this workshop, participants will have concrete products such as conference presentation/paper proposals and book reviews. Depending on participant interest, it may be possible to generate a draft of an original research article.

June 25, Wednesday

9.00-10.20

Room 215


Galina Lovtsevich

 

Galina Lovtsevich, Doctor of Philology, Head, Department of Linguistics and Intercultural Communication, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok. Her main research interests are language teaching methodology, teacher learning, professional discourse and terminology.

Trends and issues in ELT through the key terms

Plenary presentation

The theme of current trends in English Language Teaching has always been in the focus of attention as it gives new perspectives on what teachers do in the classroom. The author tackles the problem by exploring the key terms used in the ELT professional discourse for last twenty years. There have been chosen two professional journals: one is ELT Journal published by Oxford University Press in the UK, and the other one is Foreign Languages at School published by Prosveschenie in Russia. By identifying themes and key terms we highlight issues typical for two professional discourses and spot differences and commonalities.

June 23, Monday

10:45-11.30

Assembly Hall


The 10th FEELTA Conference: Looking Back and Looking into the Future

Galina Lovtsevich and Marina Rassokha

Plenary presentation

Conferencing is an integral part of the English language teaching community. So far FEELTA has held ten conferences in different cities of the Russian Far East. Why do we attend our conferences? Is it only for accounts of research and practice in our profession? The presenters will address a whole range of issues on experiences and impressions of FEELTA conferences.

June 25, Wednesday

14:40-15:10

Assembly Hall


Frances Westbrook

Frances Westbrook (Fran) arrived in Moscow in August 2012 as the new language officer for Russia. Prior to coming to Russia, Fran was the Regional English Language Officer based in Kyiv, where she was responsible for English Language Programming not only in Ukraine, but also in Belarus, Moldova, Azerbaijan, Armenia and Georgia. Before becoming a RELO, Fran lived in Thailand, India and the Czech Republic. In addition to serving as an English Language Fellow in Thailand, Fran also headed the ESL Department at the American Pacific International School in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Fran began her career in English language education in Prague, Czech Republic, and also has taught ESL in the City College system in Chicago. She has developed and implemented teacher training programs throughout South East Asia, India, and Sri Lanka.

Reflective Teaching: Why It Still Matters

Workshop

The words “reflective teaching” are very popular in professional development programs. But what is reflective teaching? Is it still relevant for teachers today? The answer is a resounding yes! This presentation will examine some of the history behind the concept of reflective teaching, and how it can be helpful to educators today. We will look at some models for reflection, and the way that developing a reflective practice can help teachers continually develop their skills.

June 24, Tuesday

10.20-11.10

Room 215








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